Hockey wasn’t enough. It seems Canada also embraced “football,” and for once, “football” doesn’t turn out to mean “soccer.” Yet while the men of the Canadian Football League put on helmets and score touchdowns, the CFL sets itself apart from the NFL in several crucial ways. Learn them here, eh?

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The CFL boasts some awesome team nicknames, including the Stampeders, Tiger-Cats and Roughriders.

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1. There are more players.
While the NFL allows 11 players on the field, the CFL finds room for 12. Which is easy because…

2. There is more field.
CFL fields measure 110 yards long by 65 yards wide, compared to the NFL’s mere 100 by 53 1/3, not to mention the CFL end zone is 20 yards deep while the NFL’s only 10. But don’t get too jealous NFL, because…

3. There is less money.
The CFL salary cap is $4.4 million per team. And yes, this does mean that it would take roughly six CFL teams to afford one Aaron Rodgers. Indeed, it would take virtually the entire league to sign a single All-Pro QB, because…

4. There are fewer teams.
The CFL currently has eight teams, with a ninth soon to join. Despite this small number, they boast an impressive amount of awesome nicknames, including the Stampeders, Tiger-Cats and Roughriders. That said, the CFL hasn’t always been so small. Because…

5. The CFL does not have a knack for expansion.
While NFL teams occasionally move—witness the Raiders and their commuting between Oakland and L.A.—they don’t disappear. Not the case with the CFL. In the ’90s, they invaded the U.S. with the Sacramento Gold Miners (later the San Antonio Texans), the Las Vegas Posse, Baltimore Stallions, Shreveport Pirates, Birmingham Barracudas and Memphis Mad Dogs. By 1996, they were all gone. The CFL is now firmly Canada-centric, with measures including…

Wait a sec, there are cheerleaders? OK, we’re on board!

6. Quotas.
A CFL team has a 41- or 42-man roster. This roster can include only 19 “import players” (non-Canadians), plus four reserves who can come from anywhere they damn well please. These “import players” are very important, because…

7. The best players come from down south.
Indeed, the man generally considered to be the greatest in CFL history is everyone’s favorite undersized quarterback, Doug Flutie. After the Heisman and the Hail Mary at Boston College but before he was an All-Pro and the NFL Comeback Player of the Year in 1998, Señor Flutie Flakes spent eight seasons in the CFL, winning six Outstanding Players (their MVP), three Grey Cups (their Super Bowl), and picking up three Grey Cup MVPs while generally shredding the record book. But don’t worry, CFL teams, even if you don’t have a Flutie…

8. Most teams still make the playoffs.
Six teams reach the playoffs. Even after expansion this year, there will still be only nine teams total. Yes, this does make the NBA regular season seem like a brutally selective process by comparison. And teams don’t only make the playoffs…

9. Everybody goes all the way! (Occasionally).
Each of the current CFL teams has won the Grey Cup at least three times. So even the long-suffering franchises haven’t suffered that much. (C’mon, Saskatchewan: 2007 wasn’t that long ago.) But that could all change because…

10. The NFL is lurking.
The CFL’s greatest fear: the Buffalo Bills move to Toronto, a city with whom they’ve long flirted and now are starting to make out with openly. While the CFL technically isn’t in direct competition with the NFL—their season runs June to November—they know all too well that the Manning brothers could buy their entire league. If the NFL does establish a team north of the border permanently, will fans stay loyal? Time will tell and until then, go Argonauts.