Riviera-featured

Vegas knows how to put on a show: Yesterday, the Riviera hotel kept its sign lit up as fireworks and cheering crowds celebrated the nighttime destruction of its 24-story Monaco Tower. (The video is well worth a look. Honestly, all it’s missing is David Copperfield making it reappear again.)

In its honor, we take a look back at other buildings put to rest in the most awesome manner possible. Yes, it’s our favorite implosions of all time (not including the Oklahoma City Thunder this year). Enjoy.

Landmark Hotel
1969-1995
When it opened, this quasi-futuristic Vegas property must have seemed pretty damned cool, like an Epcot with gambling. This implosion was deemed impressive enough to be included in Tim Burton’s 1996 film Mars Attacks!

Aladdin Hotel
1966-1998
It was neither the first nor the last Vegas casino to be imploded, but it might have kicked up the biggest dust storm. This footage is decidedly amateur (though nicely shot). Skip to the one-minute mark if you have a limited tolerance for tourists chatting.

The Kingdome
1976-2000
Seating 66,000, the Kingdome was home to a spectrum of Seattle sports teams including the Seahawks, Mariners, Sounders and Sonics. The live coverage of its demolition includes a lot of audio of the question “Are you clear?” before a cloud of dust.

Veterans Stadium
1971-2004
Home to the Eagles and Phillies, the Vet, in classic Philly fashion, refuses to go straight down and instead collapses domino-style.

Castaways
1987-2006
Yes, it’s another Vegas casino going bust. Kudos to the cameraman for focusing on a Castaways sign as the actual property crumbles behind it.

Texas Stadium
1971-2008
Home to the Dallas Cowboys before AT&T Stadium, this footage comes from a camera inside the stadium.

Grand Prince Hotel Akasaka
1982-2013ish
The thrill of an implosion clip comes from a building going from “there” to “not” in seconds. You get none of that here. Tokyo is so densely packed that imploding a 40-story building was almost impossible, with the result the Grand Prince is less demolished than “shrunk.”

And if you require a more visceral note to end on, here is the 2007 implosion of Salt Lake City’s Key Bank tower as the videographer and friends go apeshit.