Seriously. The main reason Chris Wondolowski’s miss in yesterday’s USA-Belgium World Cup match is so glaring is because it was the only really good scoring chance the team had. (Other than the Julian Green goal, of course.) And yeah, it came at the very end, so if he had put it away, the USA probably would have won.

To put all the blame on Chris Wondolowski is shortsighted. It’s saying that as long as Wondo puts that shot away, everything is OK with American soccer, and it’s not.

But Belgium… had seven chances that good. At least! But you know why nobody is blaming the guys who missed all of those chances? Because they created so many that they scored on two of them.

That’s soccer. You create half a dozen really great chances in a game, and even if you blow half of them, you still score three goals.

Look at the big picture here. The US didn’t create enough great scoring chances. Yes, Wondo should’ve at least put a shot on target. He missed badly. Like Baggio in 1994 penalty kicks badly.

But to put all the blame on Wondo is shortsighted. It’s saying that as long as Wondo puts that shot away, everything is OK with American soccer, and it’s not.

The problem goes much, much deeper. Team USA is clearly not as good as the best teams in the world right now. We were dominated by Ghana but we stole the game. We were dominated by Germany. We were dominated by Belgium.

And oh by the way, three of the four guys who scored for us in the World Cup are actually more German than they are American, and they were not developed through our youth system.

So let’s fix those problems. Let’s produce more great soccer players so that we don’t have to play the perfect game and finish 100 percent of our chances to reach the World Cup quarterfinals. Heaping all the blame on Wondo doesn’t solve anything.

Also: He should’ve been sitting on the bench watching Landon Donovan anyway.