Good news for college students and police officers everywhere: A university professor lost 27 pounds on a diet consisting almost entirely of Twinkies, Swiss Rolls, powdered donuts and a slew of other convenience store snacks.

For a period of two months, Mark Haub ate a sugary treat every three hours in lieu of regular meals. But instead of contracting a debilitating case of diabetes, Haub shed several belt sizes, lowered his cholesterol and saw his body fat plummet from 33.4 to 24.9 percent.

The catch? He only consumed 1800 calories per day.

“It’s a great reminder for weight loss that calories count,” Dawn Jackson Blatner, an Atlanta-based dietitian told CNN. “Is that the bottom line to being healthy? That’s another story.”

Haub, a professor of human nutrition at Kansas State University, adopted the unorthodox diet as part of a class project to determine the effects of snack food consumption and a limited caloric intake on the human body.

While on the diet, two-thirds of Haub’s daily 1800-calorie intake was comprised of sugary junk food. The remaining third came from a small serving of vegetables and the single protein shake that Haub drank each day.

Haub’s findings demonstrate that it may not be what you eat, but how much you eat that determines your overall health. However, despite the all-around improvement in Haub’s health statistics after the experiment, he is unwilling to state conclusively whether the diet in fact made him healthier.

“That’s where the head scratching comes,” Haub told CNN. “What does that mean? Does that mean I’m healthier? Or does it mean how we define health from a biology standpoint, that we’re missing something?”