How To Deal With Pain After Sexual Intercourse

Need to know how to deal with pain after sexual intercourse? Two thirds of women who are sexually active have experienced pain during or after sex. This means that it is important to learn how to deal with any pain that you may experience after sexual intercourse.

  1. Understand the cause of the pain. Pain after sexual intercourse can be due to many reasons, both physical and emotional. The pain may be due to vaginal dryness, an allergic reaction to condoms, a vaginal infection, a urinary tract infection, vaginal tightness, herpes, ovarian cysts, endometriosis (cells growing outside of the uterus lining) and menopause.
  2. Lubricants. If you experience extensive friction during sex and suffer pain after sexual intercourse, you will need liquid- or gel-based lubrication during sex. Do not use any oil-based lubrication as it will weaken the protection offered by condoms.
  3. A warm bath. One way to deal with pain after sexual intercourse is to take a warm bath. Do not stimulate your genitals with soap or other chemicals as this may worsen the pain.
  4. Temporary abstinence. If you experience pain after sexual intercourse, you will need to talk to your partner about it and abstain for at least seven days for the wounds at your genitals to heal.
  5. Hemorrhoid pads. Medicated hemorrhoid pads contain an astringent called witch hazel that has a soothing effect. It is safe to be used on the genitals for pain after sexual intercourse.
  6. Anti-fungal suppositories. One symptom of a yeast infection is pain during and after sexual intercourse. If you have been previously diagnosed and are familiar with other symptoms, including thick white discharge and itchiness, you may purchase over-the-counter anti-fungal suppositories and vaginal cream.
  7. Medical examination. Pain after sexual intercourse can be a symptom of more serious medical conditions, such as various types of vaginal infections and abnormal cell growth. If the pain persists, contact an OB/GYN for a pelvic exam and STD screening.
  8. Counseling. Pain related to sex may be due to psychological and emotional issues, particularly if you have had unpleasant sexual experiences. Dealing with pain after sexual intercourse in this case will entail seeking professional counseling to resolve the emotional burden surrounding sex.
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