How Does Viagra Work?

If you are like most men, you may be wondering, how does Viagra work? Viagra, or sildenafil, enjoys a huge market share in the erectile dysfunction pharmaceutical market. Despite this, most guys only have an awareness that it makes sex better in some way, somehow, but are not aware of what it actually does.

Viagra doesn’t make you horny. Many men think that taking Viagra is going to magically make them aroused. They expect to “feel” something once they ingest the little, blue, diamond-shaped pill, as if Viagra were legal ecstasy or something. Actually, when you take Viagra, you should not experience any mental effects at all. So if your problem is finding someone attractive enough to get you aroused whom you want to have sex with, try the traditional remedy for this—beer!

It's all about the blood flow. According to "The Wall Street Journal," Viagra works by blocking an enzyme called PDE-5. This enzyme resides mostly in the penis, nose and skin, and when blocked the blood flows into these areas. This takes about 30 minutes from the moment you ingest the pill. After this, it should be easier to get, and maintain, an erection, and some men report that even the slightest bump or brush will get them hard. These effects can sometimes last for several hours, and this can become a liability if you don’t want to walk around with a woody all day. Some men also report that the erections can be painful due to over-engorgement of the penis.

Other benefits and side effects. Viagra  could help maintain virility by increasing erections during sleep, called nocturnal erections. These are nature’s way of keeping your package functional, sort of like a penile workout routine. Viagra can also help women to a limited degree, as it can get blood flowing to female genitalia as well. It is not as effective as in men, however. Side effects when taking Viagra can include headaches, stuffy nose and flushness in the face.

Despite the jokes that inevitably follow when the topic of Viagra comes up, it has proven to be a lifesaver for millions of men. It has the ability to restore intimacy to otherwise dead relationships, and has reportedly mild side effects. While typically taken by men around age fifty, men of any age with a problem getting an erection should discuss this medicine with their doctor.

 

 

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