How To Fix A Foamy Keg

If you’re planning a keg party, you might want to learn how to fix a foamy keg. Actually, an ounce of prevention in this case is worth a ton of cure. Make sure that you don’t bounce the keg too much on the way home. Cushion it well in the car or truck and try to stay on fairly smooth road. Most importantly, store it vertically instead of on its side. A keg rolling from side to side on the way home is sure to be foamy when you tap it. Also, ice it down as soon as you get it home if you can’t ice it down during the trip. Warm beer will foam easier than cold beer. Make sure you have a good tap. A tap that is faulty or has bad seals can make the beer foam as it is dispensed.

To fix a foamy keg, you will need:

  • A keg of beer that’s gone foamy
  • A working tap with a functioning regulator
  • A container large enough to hold a keg and ice
  • Lots and lots and lots of ice
  • An instant read thermometer that measures down to 36 degrees
  • Time
  1. Check the beer temperature. Dispense a small amount into a cup and allow the foam to turn to liquid if there isn’t enough to dip the thermometer in. Make sure the temperature is between 36 and 40 degrees. If it isn’t, ice the keg down better. Wrap towels or blankets around the keg and container to hold in the cold.
  2. Let the keg settle. If there is a chance that the keg was shaken up during loading, transport, or unloading, the best thing to do is let it sit for several hours. As long as it is also kept cold, it will eventually settle.
  3. Check the tap. Make sure the tap is attached to the keg properly and opened all the way up. If the tap appears to be faulty, return it to the store for a new one. Most stores supply a tap with the keg, but they’re not always in the best condition. If you frequently use a keg, go to your local beer supply store and purchase your own high quality tap.
  4. Return the keg. If all else fails, call the store and see if you can trade your foamy keg for a new one. Most stores will allow this as they simply return the keg to the beer distributor for a new one.

Resources:  

http://www.probrewer.com/resources/library/bp-troubleshooting.php

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