How To Format A Script For Animated TV

Need to know how to format a script for animated TV? Even though you are writing a script for animated TV, learning how to format a script for animated TV uses the same basic format that is used for live action TV scripts. How to format a script for animated TV is broken into four different pieces; slugline, action, character and dialogue. Each of the section of how to format a script for animated TV tells your animators and voice actors what is going one within the scene, what to say and when to say it. A well written script is a combination delivering lines and giving precise stage directions.

  1. Write your sluglines. Slugline is another word for heading. The slugline goes at the beginning of the scene in the how to format a script for animated TV process. The slug line tells your voice actors and your animators where the scene is going to take place. The slugline in the how to format a script for animated TV process is broken into three pieces: interior (INT), exterior (EXT), location and time. INT and EXT will tell your animators if they should draw a scene inside or outside, the location tells them exactly where the scene is going to take place, and time tells them what time it will be during the scene. Here is an example of a slugline: EXT.  ON TOP OF A SKYSCRAPER-NIGHT. Your slugline should be written in all caps, with two spaces between INT/EXT and a hyphen between the location and time.
  2. Give them some action. The action portion of the how to format a script for animated TV process tell your animators and voice actors what is going to happening within the scene and what character will be involved in the scene. The action should go directly underneath your slugline and follows the normal rules of grammar in the how to format a script for animated TV process.
  3. Give them some character. The character portion of the how to format a script for animated TV process lets your animators and voice actors who is going to be talking at any given moment of the scene. The characters name should appear directly beneath the action with the character's name in all caps. Putting the characters name in all caps keeps the any confusion about who is speak and when to a minimum.
  4. Put your words into their mouths. Dialogue is the last step of the how to format a script for animated TV process. The dialogue goes directly underneath the characters name is essentially what the character is goring to be saying during the scene. If you are writing a scene where there are two characters talking to one another or if a character should be doing something specific while they are speaking you can add more action after the dialogue.

 

 

What Others Are Reading Right Now.

  • 13 Things to Look Forward to in Your 30s

    You’ve probably been told that your 20s will be the best years of your life. As someone in their 30s, I can tell you honestly that nothing could be further from the truth. Here are ...

  • Speakeasy

    Acting, comedy and strong spirits converge in Speakeasy. When host Paul F. Tompkins interviews entertainers—Key and Peele, Alison Brie, Rob Delaney, Zach Galifianakis—about all sor ...

  • 14 Things to Look Forward to in Your 40s

    The door is wide open to say and do anything you want. Such as the following...