How Is Urine Test Performed For STD Test?

You should know how a urine test is performed for STD testing if you are sexually active. Urine tests are an invasive test that is done to check to see if certain bacteria, viruses, or certain cells. If you are sexually active it’s important to practice methods of safe sex. Going to a doctor to have STD testing done is a simple and easy method.

To perform a urine test for STD’s, you will need:

  • Urine Sample Collection Jar
  • Genital Wash
  • Soap and Water
  1. Washing hands with soap and water. Because most STD urine collection tests are done using proper sterility methods you will need to make sure you wash your hands prior to the test.
  2. Open the urine sample collection jar. Once you opened the jar do not touch the inside of the jar. The jar has been specially prepared and sealed to maintain sterility, by touching the insides the containers is no longer sterile and you will need to obtain another one. Once the jar has been opened set the jar aside.
  3. Cleanse the genital region with genital wash. Typically clean catch urine systems come with two pre moistened cloths that are used to wash the genital region. You will want to make sure you completely cleanse the area.
  4. Passing a small amount of urine first. Before you urinate into the collection container you will want to pass a small amount of urine into the toilet first. This method helps makes sure the urine sample you are about to give does not have containments due to improper cleaning.
  5. Urinate into the collection container. Once you have passed a small amount of urine you want to collect at least an inch worth of urine in the collection container.  Once you have collected enough urine screw the lid back onto the sterile container and wipe the container clean.
  6. Wash hands. Repeat washing hands after you have finished and return the sample to the physician or nurse requesting the urine sample.

References:

Urine Culture – Clean Catch

STD Testing

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