How To Use Tortilla Machines

Learn how to use tortilla machines and enjoy fresh, homemade tortillas whenever you want. Tortilla machines range from giant pieces of equipment used in restaurants to small home appliances for the home cook. Unless you're planning on opening your own restaurant or tortilla wholesale business, tortilla machines designed for home use should suit you fine.

To use a tortilla machine, you will need:

  • A tortilla machine
  • Corn or flour tortilla dough
  1. Prepare the tortilla dough. A basic recipe for corn tortillas calls for mixing two cups of masa harina, also known as corn flour, with one-and-a-quarter cups of water and kneading until a dough forms. Make flour tortillas by mixing together two-and-three-quarter cups of flour, five tablespoons canola oil or lard and three-quarters of a cup of water.
  2. Divide the dough into equal portions. Shape each portion into a ball.
  3. Use the tortilla machine to flatten the dough. Place a dough ball onto the bottom circle of the tortilla machine. You'll want to set the ball in the center of the circle. Lower the top circle down onto the dough ball to flatten it into a tortilla. You may need to adjust the thickness on the tortilla machine to get the tortilla thin or thick enough.
  4. Cook the tortilla. Some tortilla machines are electric and cook the tortilla while flattening it. If your tortilla machine does not also cook the tortilla, open the machine and remove the tortilla. Heat a cast iron griddle or skillet over medium heat and place the tortilla on it. Cook the tortilla for less than minute, until it turns slightly golden.

 

 

What Others Are Reading Right Now.

  • Speakeasy

    Acting, comedy and strong spirits converge in Speakeasy. When host Paul F. Tompkins interviews entertainers—Key and Peele, Alison Brie, Rob Delaney, Zach Galifianakis—about all sor ...

  • What to Drink on Labor Day

    Seven options to see out the summer with style. And by style we mean a cool buzz.

  • 10 Things to Talk About This Weekend

    A 99-pack and nine other nuggets of conversational fodder.