How To Water Ski Jump

There are several skill levels to water skiing and once you are advanced enough you can learn how to water ski jump. Ski jumping is an art form in water sports and takes time to learn and skill to perform. If catching air is your idea of fun, taking on a water ski jump is perfect fun for you.

To water ski jump, you will need:

  • Life Vest
  • Gloves
  • Helmet
  • Water Ski Rope with Handle
  • Water Skis suitable for Jumping
  • Ski Jump
  1. Proper gear. Before water skiing, check the rope and handle for damage, wear, or breaks. Wear a life vest, gloves, and a helmet before attempting a water ski jump.
  2. Grip the rope. Wear water skiing gloves and hold the rope handle in a vertical position. Grip the rope in an inverted baseball grip meaning if you are right handed you would hold a baseball with the left hand under the right hand on the bat. Change hand position on the water skiing handle with the right hand below the left hand on the vertical water skiing handle.
  3. The boat. The boat pulling you toward the ski jump should be traveling between twenty and 25 mph. As the boat passes the ramp on the right side, prepare to jump using a path up the middle of the ramp to make a jump.
  4. Proper stance. Center your weight on the skis, bend knees and elbows slightly, and hold a slightly crouched position as you enter the ramp. As you leave the ramp, bend your knees, lean forward with your weight on the balls of your feet and hold the position. Keep the skis side by side and facing forward. Hold your arms straight with a slight bend in the elbows throughout the jump.
  5. Landing. The backs of your skis should touch the water first to absorb the landing. As you land, bend your knees to absorb the force.

Tip:

Be very aware of safety regulations, wear the proper protective gear, be patient as you learn, and expect to fall many times.

Get expert instruction before attempting a jump.

 

Warning:

It takes time and practice to learn to successfully take a jump on water skis. Start jumping using conservative methods until you are completely confident with the techniques of water ski jumping.

 

Reference:

Farvet, Ben, "Complete Guide to Water Skiing." Human Kinetics, 1997.

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