A new study has found that 1/3 of Americans don’t floss. What’s even more surprising to us is that 2/3 do. It also turns out that men floss less than women.

The study, based on data from the CDC’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, is based on 9,000 adults aged 30 and over. It showed that 32.4% reported no flossing, 37.3% reported less than daily flossing, and 30.3% reported flossing daily.

What’s surprising is that 2/3 of respondents said that they do, indeed, regularly floss. I say they’re lying.

I don’t know about you, but every time I go to the dentist, I get lectured about flossing. And I do floss. Sometimes. I go through periods – often before and after a dental appointment – when I’m fastidious about my flossing. I also go through periods when I’d rather hit the sack than spend an entire minute assuring my dental hygiene.

I know it’s good for me. I know it’ll make my life easier, but for whatever reason, getting that little string out to jam between my teeth is one of the most forgettable tasks in my daily routine.

I know it’s good for me. I know it’ll make my life easier, but for whatever reason, getting that little string out to jam between my teeth is one of the most forgettable tasks in my daily routine.

And I lie to my dentist when she asks if I floss all the time. I’d rather make her happy for that split second than explain to her that I’m too lazy to do one of life’s simplest health rituals.

The author of the study, Dr. Duong Nguyen, told CNN that the way to get yourself flossing is simple repetition.

“Repetition is the key to mastering,” Nguyen said. “If you hear it more and hear it from different places, maybe it will stick a little more.”

So get to it, gentlemen. Or don’t. We won’t tell. Or you won’t. Yeah.