Glassdoor.com, a new online startup, is trying to become the newest pimp for all your voyeuristic salary snooping desires. Now you can find out how much your loser brother-in-law is making over at his big accounting firm job.

Will this lead to anyone with an internet connection being well informed enough to know to hit you up for money? Some are calling it the next best thing for job hunters, while others pass it off as useless ‘salary porn’. Which begs the question, are porn salaries a part of this site too? Sadly, the answer is no, but it’s a useful site anyway.

The site is currently in a free trial stage and is allowing all visitors to view salary info for employees at Microsoft and Google free of charge. You may have seen this earlier when we linked some info this morning in the ‘Funny and Money Thursday Daily Links’ post.

According to Julia Bornstein of CNBC, there is one big catch that will deter the salary peeper inside all of us:

As much as I’d love to voyeuristically read all about the employment landscape, I can’t say I’d feel comfortable about offering my own info. I’m sure [my employer-] NBC Universal wouldn’t want to encourage such behavior, to say the least. Glassdoor checks your e-mail address and its staffers contact you if there are any questions of authenticity. If you don’t mind sharing, you can peruse all sorts of data, and when it comes to salary info, you can graph and sort by employee function.

Although Julia seems to have used the word ‘peruse‘ incorrectly in that quote (Sorry, a pet peeve of mine. It’s the most misused word in the English language. Really means to study in great detail, not skim through casually), she does raise an interesting point.

Glassdoor works on the ‘I’ll show you mine if you show me yours‘ concept and requires all would-be salary peekers to first give in-depth information about their own job’s salary. Of course this wouldn’t be an issue for an unhappy employee already looking for another job, but it does hinder the ideal of having all salary information out in the open with Wikipedia-like access.

What if some jobless deadbeat guy wants to start looking up salaries? He wouldn’t be able to use Glassdoor due to his lack of experience in the working world. I suppose jobless deadbeats aren’t really the revenue driving target audience that Glassdoor is afraid to miss out on.

I am contemplating making up some ‘authentic salary information’ so that I can check out a few of these entries though. How much does a Starbucks manager make?!

Feel free to post your own salary info in the comments section!

CNBC: New Web Startup Makes Salaries Transparent, June 12, 2008