Go ahead and cancel your dinner reservations. We all know dinner dates suck anyway.

If you’ve got plans tonight with that special someone, find the darkest open space you can and watch the Perseid Meteor Shower.

Tonight will be the most epic it will be until the year 2036.

In a good year you can see 60 meteors per hour. This year will be twice that as we collide into Jupiter’s outsized orbit, with as many as three per minute in peak hours. (Think: Natural Fireworks Finale.)

Here’s what you need to know:

Every August the Earth drifts through an asteroid belt left behind by the Swift-Tuttle comet that orbits the sun every 133 years.

The debris from this enters the Earth’s atmosphere and explodes. The light from this is the so-called “shooting star.”

Get outside at 10 p.m. and give your eyes 45 minutes to adapt to the dark skies. Light pollution is not your friend. Peak hours will be midnight to dawn, local time Thursday and Friday.

The key to adjusting is to relax. This is a great time for a lawn chair. Also, relax your eyes as the dead center of your vision cannot see light and dark.

Most of what you’re seeing is just space dust. Some no bigger than a grain of sand. But the 17 meter meteor that exploded over Russia in 2013 was about 30-40 times more powerful than the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima.

Specifically, North America will see space dust from the year 1079. Eastern Europe and Turkey will see fresher dust from the 15th and 19th Century.

Terminology: The meteor is the flash in the sky, the meteorite is the rock/iron ore/etc that makes it to Earth in one piece (very rare).

Weirdly, there’s no ancient lore about meteor showers. Ancient people thought of them like lightning. It wasn’t until the 19th century that people could connect shooting stars to meteorites.

In a good year you can see 60 meteors per hour. This year will be twice that as we collide into Jupiter’s outsized orbit, with as many as three per minute in peak hours. (Think: Natural Fireworks Finale.)

Imagine Jupiter’s gravity is the engine of a ship and asteroids are the wake it leaves behind. “Jupiter is a real gravitational bully,” says Bill Cooke, lead of NASA’s Meteoroid Environments Office. “In our solar system there’s the sun and Jupiter and the rest is garbage.”

These aren’t dangerous and Jupiter’s gravitational pull otherwise does a great job of protecting Earth from asteroids.

No telescopes or binoculars necessary. Maybe use this free app while you wait.

Also, normally we’d say skip the alcohol as it is known to deteriorate night vision. But this year is going to be lit. More lit than it was in 1996. So go ahead and break out a nice rosé and make sure to bring a bottle of water. I suggest you go to a trustworthy shop and ask for a Bandol Rosé. It has a mineral quality from its steep terroir that pairs well is asteroids.

It’s a bit pricey for a park wine ($18-30). But fuck it. This is the craziest the night sky has been since dial-up.