Volunteer firefighters are often unsung heroes, and Jamie Brock just proved that they are some of the most humble heroes, too.

In Townville, S.C., a teenager who shot and killed his father at their home on Wednesday was apparently on his way to do more killing when he opened fire outside Townville Elementary School.

The killer arrived at the school parking lot after a sobbing phone call to his grandparents. On arrival, he started firing a handgun as he moved toward the school, most likely to start a killing spree. He was then apprehended by volunteer firefighter Jamie Brock who has been with the Townville Volunteer Fire Department for 30 years.

Volunteer Firefighters are men and women who work extra hours for a local area, often in addition to their day jobs. They perform fire suppression and other emergency services alongside career firefighters.

Brock was unarmed and apparently just subdued the teen out of sheer badassery.

Sheriff John Skipper wasn’t sure, either.

“I think he just took him down,” Skipper said.

“Firefighter Brock is absolutely a hero,” said Scott Stoller of Anderson County Emergency Management, a government agency that handles local emergency situations.

Brock, however, isn’t looking for accolades. According to Stoller, Brock believes “he did nothing any of the other volunteer firefighters wouldn’t have done.”

Thanks to Brock, there were no further casualties on what could have been a horrible day. He’s a hero, and we salute you, Jamie Brock.

A teacher and a student were taken to AnMed Health Medical Center and have already been released, and another student was airlifted to the Greenville Memorial Emergency Trauma center where he was still listed in critical condition as of 8:00pm Wednesday. The school is closed for the rest of the week.

Volunteer firefighters are men and women who work extra hours for a local area, often in addition to their day jobs. They perform fire suppression and other emergency services alongside career firefighters.

While some of them are indeed paid for the hours they work (although it’s estimated that they only make 20 percent as much as career firefighters), they’re usually on call when they could be home sleeping or living their lives. They go through the same training as career firefighters. In short, they’re awesome people.