Early last year, a confirmed paranoid schizophrenic was sentenced to life in prison for the deaths of Chad Littlefield and American Sniper Chris Kyle. They were at a shooting range in Texas. Lawyers for the shooter—Eddie Ray Roth, 27, a former Marine—pled insanity. The only thing to learn from this today is how many Veterans and Active Duty servicemen and servicewomen can use our help right now.

So instead of moralizing about war or guns or how we treated our Veterans in the past, let’s all pick one of the following groups and send them $1 today. Get on their mailing lists. Share among friends. Like them on Facebook. Show some support.

The below Veterans charities got an A or A+ from charitywatch.org, a non-profit that audits charities financial statements. Why not give them a look? It is Veterans Day, after all.

Armed Services YMCA: Provides programs and support services to military service members and their families with a particular focus on junior-enlisted men and women.

Fisher House Foundation: Provides military families housing close to a loved one during hospitalization for an illness, disease or injury.

Homes for our Troops: Provides mortgage-free, specially adapted homes nationwide for severely injured Veterans of post 9/11, enabling them to rebuild their lives.

Injured Marine Semper Fi Fund: Provides immediate financial assistance and lifetime support to post 9/11 wounded, critically ill and injured members of all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces, and their families.

Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund: Provides support for the families of military personnel lost in service to our nation, and for severely wounded military personnel and veterans.

Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society: Provides financial assistance and education, as well as other programs and services, to members of the United States Navy and Marine Corps, their eligible family members, widows, and survivors.

National Military Family Organization: Fights for benefits and programs that strengthen and protect Uniformed Services families and reflect the Nation’s respect for their service.

Operation Homefront: Leads more than 2,500 volunteers with nationwide presence who provide emergency and other financial assistance to the families of service members and wounded warriors.

 

Also, the post office no longer accepts packages addressed to “Any Wounded Soldier”. So try these for active duty:

Adopt a Platoon: Support the troops through gifts and sponsored mail.

Any Soldier: Sponsor care packages to servicemembers in Iraq.

Army and Air Force Exchange Services: Purchase gift certificates for active and hospitalized servicemembers.

Blue Star Mothers: Organizes postcards to troops and care packages, and is currently petitioning Congress for reduced air fares for servicemembers.

Books for Soldiers: Donate books, movies, and more.

Cell Phones for Soldiers: Donate your old cell phones, which pay for calling cards for our troops.

Commissary Gift Certificates: Give the gift of groceries—buy or donate gift certificates.

A Million Thanks: Collects emails and letters of appreciation for our armed forces.

Operaton Dear Abby: Send greetings and messages of support.

Operation Give: Donate toys to be given to the children of Iraq.

Operation Gratitude: Contribute to care packages sent to our servicemembers.

Operation Homefront Hugs: Contribute to care packages, or adopt a servicemember.

Operation Troop Aid: Provide care packages for our deployed U.S. Servicemembers.

Operation USO Care Package: Sponsor a care package for $25.

 

We also love the great Wounded Warrior Project (a real-life version of their logo leads this post). But the only thing we can say about why it’s so important to support—in any way today—is the simple mission of my favorite group:

“Wherever and whenever they go, the USO will be there, until everyone comes home.”

And when they do: Support them. House them.

Above all: Hire them.